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$537,500 Flat Creek Ranch (Cascade, MT)

0 Hound Creek Road, Cascade, MT, MT 59421

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0 Hound Creek Road

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license info: Licensed Real Estate Agent, Corder and Associates, LLC
Located twelve miles southeast of Cascade, these 269 acres provide opportunities for grazing and dryland farming. Presently, 40 acres are dedicated to cultivating sanfoin hay. The property features a seasonal creek running through a section of the land. Underground power lines accompany the dirt driveway. The area boasts nutrient-rich native grasses and pastures suitable for cattle, sheep, or horses, enclosed within perimeter sheep fencing. Situated in proximity to various recreational amenities, the Smith River lies to the east, the Missouri River to the northwest, and the Little Belt Mountains to the southeast. Residents can engage in fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, or taking scenic drives to appreciate the diverse landscapes and wildlife.

Local Area

Follow the Missouri River out of the vast, grand mountains until it flows out to the rolling plains, and there, you’ll find the delightful fishing town of Cascade, Montana. There are unlimited opportunities to enjoy the great outdoors here including wildlife viewing, fishing, and hunting. Should you need a bite to eat or some bait, Cascade retains a grocery store, gas station, post office, a couple of lively bars, and fun hardy folks! Get out and about and notice the numerous public fishing access spots along the mighty Missouri River. Cascade serves as a popular location to start a float down the river. Additionally, Eagle Island or Hardy Bridge also offers day use for river access. If you want a short escapade, take the day trip to the Crown Butte Preserve which is located halfway between Cascade and Simms. Hike to the flat-topped buttes and revel in the natural grassland vegetation 1000 feet above the great plains below. If you’re in the mood for some history, stop by the Cascade Senior Center and Museum for a taste of local history.

Ulm, Montana is a small community comprised of mostly ranchers and farmers 12 miles southwest of Great Falls off I-15. Historically, Ulm came to be as a result of the Great Northern Railway coming through in 1887. The railroad provided a local shipping point for wheat, cattle, and other agricultural commodities.
Area Attractions
Smith River
Each February a drawing is held to designate 9 lucky entries permits to float. The river’s popularity is a result of the various terrains and spectacular sights that are cherished throughout a float trip. The Smith River begins near White Sulphur Springs and twists and turns for more than 100 miles. The stretch of river from Camp Baker Access to the Eden Bridge is the most popular. The fishing throughout is exceptional with populations of brown and rainbow trout ranging in sizes from 13-16 inches long. The larger brown trout scatter in the deep pools or hover along undercut banks.
Adel Mountains
The Lewis and Clark Expedition passed through the canyon near what is today Cascade, Montana in July of 1805. They were greatly impressed by the Adel Mountain Volcanics, the eroded pile of volcanic rocks more than 40 miles long and 20 miles wide. The volcanics mostly consist of fragments—blocks, cinders, ash—from violent, explosive eruptions that blasted magma out of the earth and into the air. The eruptions occurred about 75 million years ago and continued for several million years.
Little Belt Mountains
The Little Belt Mountains are a section of the rugged Rocky Mountains. They lie mostly in the Lewis and Clark National Forest. The unspoiled nature is used for logging and recreation. The mountains have been mined for silver since the 1880s and sapphires since 1896. The famous Yogo sapphire is mined near Yogo Creek. The highest peak of the range is Big Baldy Mountain towering at 9,175 feet. Ponderosa pines and Douglas-firs predominantly fill the forest providing cover for black bear, elk, white-tailed, and mule deer. Rifle and archery hunting is excellent, and during the fall, hunter’s orange can be spotted trekking up the trails. The hum of motorized vehicles can often be heard as it is a popular sport here as well.
Premier Fishing and Hunting
The Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks stocks Holter Lake annually with a significant number of rainbow trout. To catch a sizable trout, you will need to take a boat out and sink lines deep. Spin fishing is the most popular method used on the lake because of the various depths. Large spoons or live bait are used to catch the bigger fish. In addition to rainbow trout, Holter Lake also has mountain whitefish, brook trout, brown trout, pike, walleye, and yellow perch. Fly fishing is less popular on the lake but below the dam is where the blue ribbon stretch of the Missouri River begins. There is one entity that draws thousands of visitors from all around the world to this area and that is the fishing. These waters are filled with nutrients from the cold tailwaters from the bottom of Holter Dam creating a smorgasbord of feed for those finicky fish. As a result, the population of rainbow and brown trout surged averaging about 7000+ fish per mile of river. These fish are frequently greater than 10 inches in length! The river is a playground offering year-round fishing. In addition to the plethora of fishing access sites along Interstate 15, there are numerous streams and creeks in the area to tackle. Holter Lake, Hauser Lake, and Canyon Ferry Lake also provide excellent fishing and boating.

The central location puts you in the middle of tremendous hunting opportunities. Montana offers millions of acres of public lands for which to roam and hunt as well as diverse habitats providing homes to the many different species of wildlife. The avid hunter can pursue big game animals including white-tailed and mule deer, elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, mountain lions, and black bears. Upland birds and waterfowl also provide excellent prospects.

Holter Lake

The emerald-green waters of the spanning lake stretched out in front of the property provide the difference between country living and utterly wonderful recreation and lake living! Holter Dam on the Missouri River forms the lake. Holter Lake is popular for its fishing and its water recreational attributes. Many visit the lake to camp, boat (non-motor and motorized), water ski, surf, wakeboard, swim, tube, float, hike, photograph, and view wildlife and birds. With boundless recreation opportunities, the lake makes a busy spot in the summer months among locals. The lake is a moderate-sized reservoir at 3660 acres. Access to the lake is wonderful. Several boat ramps exist along the shore with several designated fishing access sites. Located in the west-central portion of the state near Helena, Montana, there are also well-maintained campgrounds available. The lake is surrounded by rugged and majestic mountains and sparsely wooded hills. This area is also rich in history as Lewis and Clark made their famous trek through this area 200 years ago. You’ll be stunned by the views of the Sleeping Giant Wilderness Study Area and the Gates of the Mountains is a beloved trip via watercraft.

First Peoples Buffalo Jump State Park

This buffalo jump is considered to be the longest in the United States. The native people utilized the jump for at least two thousand years before Lewis and Clark ventured through on their expedition through Montana. The park has an interpretive trail, picnic tables, and a protected black-tailed prairie dog town.

Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

This shallow basin was left as a result of the last glacier in the area. It covers over 5000 acres and is a bird haven. The refuge supports a variety of wildlife and migratory waterfowl.

Freezeout Lake Wildlife Management Area

The Freezeout Lake Wildlife Management Area is located between Fairfield and Choteau and is known for the massive snow geese and tundra swan migrations that take place in the spring and fall.

post id: 7740821703

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